Medication Explained 💊

Aspirin

I’m not a Pharmacist or a Doctor. However, I have a degree in Medicinal Chemistry and I have found that my peers have found it beneficial when they ask me about what they have been prescribed. I’m able to put it in to Layman’s terms and not blind with science. 

If you have any questions about any medications, I would be more than happy to help.

Aspirin is a salicylate. It works by reducing substances in the body that cause pain, fever, and inflammation. It is sometimes used to treat or prevent heart attacks, strokes, and chest pain (angina). This is achieved by irreversibly inhibiting the COX-1 and 2 enzymes, via acetylation, which results in decreased formation of prostaglandin precursors.

Aspirin should be used for cardiovascular conditions only under the supervision of a doctor.

You should not use aspirin if you have a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia, a recent history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, or if you are allergic to an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as Advil, Motrin, Aleve, Orudis, Indocin, Lodine, Voltaren, Toradol, Mobic, Relafen, Feldene, and others.

Do not give this medication to a child or teenager with a fever, flu symptoms, or chickenpox. Salicylates can cause Reye’s syndrome, a serious and sometimes fatal condition in children.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking aspirin. Heavy drinking can increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

If you are taking this medicine to prevent a heart attack or stroke, avoid also taking ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin). Ibuprofen may make this medicine less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels. If you must use both medications, ask your doctor how far apart your doses should be.

Side effects are generally related to the stomach. If you are in pain in your stomach or intestinal region contact your doctor. Nausea, headaches, blood in your stool and ringing in the ears are also noted side effects.

Ask your doctor before using aspirin if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone. Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use aspirin if you are also using any of the following drugs:

  • a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven), or other medication used to prevent blood clots; or
  • other salicylates such as Nuprin Backache Caplet, Kaopectate, KneeRelief, Pamprin Cramp Formula, Pepto-Bismol, Tricosal, Trilisate, and others.

Published by Rochdalestu

I’m a 38 year old male who has recently been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I have found it as a new chapter in my life that has opened my eyes to a whole new perspective on myself and everything around me.

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